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December 2020

PFAS chemical associated with severe COVID-19

By PFAS in the news, PFAS in the news, PFAS in the news, PFAS in the news, PFAS in the news, PFAS-REACH team news, PFAS-REACH team news

ELEVATED LEVELS OF a PFAS compound were associated with more severe forms of Covid-19, according to a Danish study now undergoing peer review. The research, which involved 323 patients infected with the coronavirus, found that those who had elevated levels of a chemical called PFBA were more than twice as likely to have a severe form of the disease. Read more…

What Lessons Should We Learn from the PFAS Crisis?

By Uncategorized

How a problem is framed often shapes the range of solutions considered. Ubiquitous global contamination by PFAS (per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances), human-synthesized chemicals that are water and grease repellent and found in human blood, drinking water, and wildlife, is a problem that has been framed in a number of ways. While environmental regulation is often framed as driven by scientific knowledge, our research finds that in U.S. the implementation of chemical regulation is more commonly driven by scientific ignorance and corporate malfeasance. Read more…

Toxic PFAS chemicals discovered in hundreds of products

By PFAS in the news

SCIENTISTS HAVE DETAILED more than 200 uses of PFAS chemicals in 64 industrial areas, including mining, book conservation, plastics production, photography, printing, watchmaking, car manufacturing, air conditioning, fingerprinting, and particle physics. Many of the uses, which are laid out in an article published in the journal Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, were previously unknown. Read more…

PFAS chemicals are ubiquitous. A Pitt scientist is working to protect you from thousands of types at once.

By Uncategorized

A single PFAS chemical featured in the movie “Dark Waters” last year about contamination from a Teflon plant in Parkersburg, W.Va. resulted in a $670 million court settlement. A community study showed the chemical was linked to six diseases: kidney cancer, increased cholesterol, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disease, preeclampsia and testicular cancer. Read more…