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Monthly Archives

January 2021

New PFAS study reveals ‘forever’ pollutants persisting in NM’s waters

By PFAS in the news

Winding its way through forests of conifer and aspen, cottonwoods and sycamores, the Gila River descends out of the nation’s first wilderness area, designated in 1924. For almost a century, a U.S. Geological Survey stream gage just below that boundary has tracked the river’s flows.   

Now, samples from that spot reveal the presence of toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances.  Read more…

Firefighters Want Halt on Money From Makers of PFAS-Laden Gear

By PFAS in the news

Members of the nation’s largest firefighters’ union want their organization to stop accepting funds from gear makers until they commit to ridding the garments of so-called “forever chemicals.”

Manufacturers of protective garments worn by firefighters have given at least $420,000 to the International Association of Fire Fighters since 2016, according to a review of federal disclosures by Bloomberg Industry Group. Read more…

New Clues Help Explain Why PFAS Chemicals Resist Remediation

By PFAS in the news

The synthetic chemicals known as PFAS, short for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are found in soil and groundwater where they have accumulated, posing risks to human health ranging from respiratory problems to cancer.

New research from the University of Houston and Oregon State University published in Environmental Science and Technology Letterssuggests why these “forever chemicals” – so called because they can persist in the environment for decades – are so difficult to permanently remove and offers new avenues for better remediation practices. Read more…

PFAS exposure found to increase risk of severe Covid-19

By PFAS in the news

Toxicologists are expressing concern that exposure to per- or poly-fluorinated substances (PFASs) can increase a person’s likelihood of developing severe Covid-19. There are also warning that PFASs could also diminish the effectiveness of a vaccine against the novel coronavirus.

A number of studies in the scientific literature have now linked elevated PFAS levels with immune system suppression, as well as decreased response to vaccines. Read more…

White House intervened to weaken EPA guidance on ‘forever chemicals’

By PFAS in the news

Documents reviewed by The Hill show the White House intervened as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was weighing a strict ban on imports of products that contain a cancer-linked compound, substantially weakening the guidance.

The guidance in question sought to limit potential exposure to a group of chemicals abbreviated as PFAS, used as a nonstick coating on products ranging from raincoats to carpets to cookware. Read more…