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fitzstevens

What Lessons Should We Learn from the PFAS Crisis?

By PFAS in the news, PFAS-REACH team news

How a problem is framed often shapes the range of solutions considered. Ubiquitous global contamination by PFAS (per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances), human-synthesized chemicals that are water and grease repellent and found in human blood, drinking water, and wildlife, is a problem that has been framed in a number of ways. While environmental regulation is often framed as driven by scientific knowledge, our research finds that in U.S. the implementation of chemical regulation is more commonly driven by scientific ignorance and corporate malfeasance. Read more…

Toxic PFAS chemicals discovered in hundreds of products

By PFAS in the news

SCIENTISTS HAVE DETAILED more than 200 uses of PFAS chemicals in 64 industrial areas, including mining, book conservation, plastics production, photography, printing, watchmaking, car manufacturing, air conditioning, fingerprinting, and particle physics. Many of the uses, which are laid out in an article published in the journal Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, were previously unknown. Read more…

PFAS chemicals are ubiquitous. A Pitt scientist is working to protect you from thousands of types at once.

By PFAS in the news

A single PFAS chemical featured in the movie “Dark Waters” last year about contamination from a Teflon plant in Parkersburg, W.Va. resulted in a $670 million court settlement. A community study showed the chemical was linked to six diseases: kidney cancer, increased cholesterol, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disease, preeclampsia and testicular cancer. Read more…

Governor Cuomo Signs Legislation Banning Incineration of Firefighting Foam Containing PFAs in Certain New York Cities

By PFAS in the news

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today signed legislation (S.7880-B/A.9952-B) banning the incineration of Aqueous Film Forming Foam containing perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the emerging contaminants known as PFAS, in certain cities. Under the new law, incineration of this foam is prohibited in cities designated as Environmental Justice areas by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation where the population is between 16,000 and 17,000 residents. The law goes into effect immediately and bolsters the Department’s ongoing response to concerns raised by residents in the City of Cohoes residents to ensure the environment and community are protected after foam containing PFAS was disposed at the Norlite facility. Read more…